Castle Rushen

Isle of Man

The oldest form of mediaeval fortress is represented by the central Keep, the great square tower of stone with walls nine or ten feet thick. In the late twelth century, when it was first built, nothing much more would be needed. The first known reference to Castle Rushen is in the Chronicon Mannice, where it is stated that in 1265 King Magnus died in the Castle Rushen. Whether he built it or not we may never know, but there is little doubt that his century must have credit of starting the building.


Rushen Abbey

Isle of Man

The ruins of Rushen Abbey, or of the Abbey of St. Mary of Russin, are situated on the western bank of the Silverburn, close by the village of Ballasalla, in the parish of Malew and Sheading of Rushen, two miles north of Castletown, Isle of Man. Several illustrious persons were interred in the Abbey. Reginald, Bishop of Sodor and Man, nephew to Olave Kleining, King of Man, was buried there in 1225. King Olave Godredson (Olave the Black) in 1237, and his son Reginald in 1248. The last Norwegian King of Man, Magnus, was interred in the abbey in 1265.